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Tools for Starting a Medication Access Program

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posted: 02/07/2011

This document, intended for a hospital setting, provides a sample job description, list of justifications for creating the position and a projection of budget savings from creation of the position.

posted: 02/11/2009

Discover Total Resources: A Guide for Nonprofits is neither a textbook nor a directory. It is, rather, a descriptive checklist to be used as a guide, or self-audit, by boards, staff and volunteers to assess the degree to which they are tapping a full range of community resources: people, money, goods and services.

posted: 02/11/2009

Starting a Pharmaceutical Program
The St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in South Bend, Indiana is a hospital that operates a free clinic as part of its care system. Saint Joseph’s Health Center has operated the clinic since 1986. As part of its commitment to health care the clinic hosts an on-site medication room that provides medication to residents of St. Joseph’s county who are seen at the clinic, seen by a physician in the clinic’s referral network or seen at St. Joseph’s emergency room.

posted: 02/11/2009

Starting a Pharmaceutical Program
The Program for Pharmaceutical Care to Underserved Populations (PPCUP), located in Pittsburgh, PA, operates under the auspices of the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy. Established in 1995, the program links volunteer pharmacists and students with three organizations providing primary health care to homeless and low-income individuals in the city. Through the participation of the School of Pharmacy, pharmacists, and pharmacy students, the PPCUP stores medication for its organizational partners; sends pharmacists and pharmacy students to join volunteer medical staff as they provide health care at shelters and drop-in centers; and works with partner organizations to support costeffective prescribing.

posted: 02/11/2009

Starting a Pharmaceutical Program
WV Health Right, established in 1982, is a free clinic serving the uninsured and underinsured in Charleston, WV. As part of its commitment to health care, the clinic provides medication for free, both to its patients and to individuals referred by physicians in the Charleston area. The clinic’s pharmaceutical access program enjoys support from local pharmacists, physicians, hospitals and the City of Charleston.

posted: 02/01/2011

The National Council on Aging's information page with 12 detailed strategies for bringing money into your organization.  Its information is applicable to any non-profit organization struggling with fundraising and revenue generation.

 

posted: 03/04/2009

Whether you are a small group of concerned people interested in starting a clinic in a church basement or a large community coalition with years of experience in public health, opening a free clinic can be an exciting and challenging endeavor. This manual is designed to answer many of the questions that arise as you plan to open a free clinic. If you have additional questions or would like to be put in touch with other clinicians and concerned individuals around the country who have started clinics, please contact Volunteers in Health Care.

posted: 02/11/2009

From Volunteers in Healthcare, a how-to guide to starting your own pharmaceutical access program.

posted: 02/11/2009

Although patient assistance programs provide many benefits, locating information on these programs and navigating the application process can be complex and overwhelming. This manual from Volunteers in Health Care is intended to serve as a reference for both individual prescribers and organizations that want to implement a PAP system to help patients who cannot afford needed medications.

posted: 02/11/2009

This manual was developed to provide information to free clinics regarding regulations and subsequent exemptions to parts of those regulations issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in December, 2000. These regulations address the donation of physician samples to charitable institutions.

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